Tuba and Piano

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  1. Fantasy and Variations on the Carnival of Venice

    Composer: Arban, Jean Baptist Arranger: Doughty, Bryan
    Instrumentation: Solo and Piano Instruments: Piano, Tuba
    Genre: Theme and Variation
    with Piano

    F tuba version

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    From $20.00

    To $40.00

  2. Capricious Suite

    Composer: Paff, John
    Instrumentation: Solo and Piano Instruments: Piano, Tuba
    Genre: Contemporary
    with Piano

    By the title, one might expect something unusual, and they would be correct. This three-movement suite begins with a slow tempo introduction, moving to a faster main part. However, soon some additional sounds emerge. In places, the player is asked to sing through the instrument, while playing other notes. To make this more manageable, the played notes are usually in a low range and do not move quickly. This allows the vocal sounds to be made more easily. The player may choose their most comfortable octave to sing the vocal notes. Most are written as “ah” sounds, with the exception of a few that are done while not playing a note, and are written as “la”, and still intended to be through the instrument. Other “extra” sounds are done with tapping and occasional stomping. Tapping can be done on any nearby surface. A plastic shoebox works well and could be placed on a close-by table or chair. Tapping could also be done on one’s instrument, but many might prefer another surface.

    The three movements are in contrasting styles and tempos. There is enough “normal” material in this piece to make it more friendly to an audience than it could be, considering the extra sounds. Players may need to work on the singing while playing aspect in order to feel comfortable doing it. Also, players may want to try several tapping surfaces to see which they prefer. All in all, Capricious Suite for Tuba and Piano contains some unexpected sounds, but should be fun and interesting to play and hear. Learn More

    From $20.00

    To $40.00

  3. Russian Ballade, A

    Composer: Prokofiev, Sergei Arranger: Green, James M.
    Instrumentation: Solo and Piano Instruments: Piano, Tuba
    Genre: Contemporary
    with Piano Op. 15 Learn More

    From $20.00

    To $40.00

  4. Two Pieces

    Composer: Deason, David
    Instrumentation: Solo and Piano Instruments: Piano, Tuba
    Genre: Contemporary
    with Piano Learn More
    $17.00
  5. Tempo di Minuetto

    Composer: Kreisler, F Arranger: French, Todd M.
    Instrumentation: Solo and Piano Instruments: Piano, Tuba
    Genre: Classical

    with Piano

    In the style of Pugnani

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    From $18.00

    To $36.00

  6. Concerto for Tuba

    Composer: Cross, Steven
    Instrumentation: Solo and Piano Instruments: Piano, Tuba
    Genre: Contemporary

    with Piano

    3 Movements

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    From $30.00

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  7. Intensity

    Composer: Halvorson, David
    Instrumentation: Solo and Piano Instruments: Piano, Tuba
    Genre: Contemporary

    with Piano

    In the keys of Eb major and C minor, which are very friendly to the BBb Tuba, this is a fun piece for an emerging tuba player.  It was written for a 6th grade tuba student who is also a very good basketball player and also loves riding horses in rodeos.  She does everything with "Intensity" thus the title.

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    From $17.00

    To $34.00

  8. Memories of Good Old Friends

    Composer: Dan, Luo
    Instrumentation: Solo and Piano Instruments: Piano, Tuba
    Genre: Contemporary
    with Piano Learn More

    As low as $18.00

  9. Concerto for Tuba

    Composer: McMillan, Benjamin
    Instrumentation: Solo and Piano Instruments: Piano, Tuba
    Genre: Contemporary

    with Piano

    This work was commissioned by Timothy Northcut in honor of Winston Morris, professor of tuba and euphonium at Tennessee Tech University since 1967. Among many others, his former students—both Tim and I included—call him a mentor, friend, and genuine hero to the tuba-euphonium world. Anyone who’s met Winston knows that he’s a larger-than-life character, and our goal was to capture a snapshot of that character within the piece.

    The first movementRWM, is constructed from a rhythmic motive that forms the basis of the entire work: 1/4 note followed by 4 1/8 notes

    This motive, based on the name ‘R. Winston Morris’, becomes the driving force throughout the work, acting as a musical anchor point. The entrance of the solo tuba introduces the main musical theme that goes on to form much of the melodic material. Conceptually, the first movement represents a day in September of 1967 as Morris began his career at Tennessee Tech University. Beginning with a gentle, noble theme, the mood quickly builds and shifts into an energetic and sometimes whimsical whirlwind. The end of the movement relentlessly hammers out the motive—a tribute to Winston’s unrelenting musical drive. This abruptly shifts with the final note, moving seamlessly into the second movement.

    The second movementSweet Steel, is dedicated in loving memory to Barbara “Bobbie” Morris. Although the tone is very dark and brooding, it’s ultimately a love song by the soloist, journeying through the stages of grief. From the darkness a second theme, hopeful and uplifting, rises to a heartfelt climax.

    The final movementCookevegas, is a tongue-in-cheek reference to Cookeville, TN, home of Winston and Tennessee Tech University. His love of jazz is a major influence on this hectic, jazzy trip through the small Southern city. A return of the driving ‘RWM’ motive from the first movement brings the concerto to its finale.

    Recording is from the premiere with the U.S. Army Band:

    https://www.usarmyband.com/tuba/index.html

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    From $28.00

    To $56.00

  10. Concerto

    Composer: Flinn, Wes
    Instrumentation: Solo and Piano Instruments: Piano, Tuba
    Genre: Contemporary

    with Piano

    While the piece is in three movements (fast-slow-fast), calling it “traditional” does not seem entirely appropriate. Rather, it adapts received forms and structures with a more adventurous harmonic approach and a greater use of dissonance in individual lines.

    The first movement starts with what I call “the first stones rolling downhill” – this tumbling motive generates the principal theme. The second theme provides lyrical contrast. The themes are developed in the middle and during the cadenza. There is no break between the first movement and the elegiac second movement. The third and final movement makes us question how we hear simple versus compound subdivisions rhythmically.
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    From $28.00

    To $56.00

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